Pearl Software Blog

Internet Monitoring and Web Filtering Topics

The Cost of Malware and Spyware

As businesses of all sizes increasingly use cloud storage and services and incorporate the Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) approach to employee management, malware and spyware are growing threats that can financially cripple or destroy a business. While it is important to understand the true costs of these attacks on a business, it is best to start with an explanation of the difference between malware and spyware and approaches to removing them.

What are Malware & Spyware?

Malware, which is short for “malicious software”, is designed to infiltrate and damage a computer without your consent. Malware includes computer viruses, worms, Trojan horses, scareware and more. It can be present on websites and emails or hidden in downloadable files, photos, videos, freeware or shareware.

Spyware focuses on surreptitiously collecting information about your usage through approaches like key logging to record your keystrokes. Spyware usually doesn’t self-replicate like other forms of malware. However, like other forms of malware, spyware can cause just as much harm to a computer, a network and a business. This can have dire financial implications for a business if the spyware is able to access the business’s or its customers’ financial data.

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Malware vs. Spyware

Security is a growing concern for many businesses. With the number and scope of cyber attacks increasing every year, companies and organizations need to be aware of the different threats that face them, how to spot suspicious activity, and what to expect when a security incident occurs.

Malware and spyware are two terms often used when discussing cyber security. Although they are often used interchangeably, they actually carry different meanings. Malware and spyware are among the most common attacks that a company will experience, thus it is important to understand their differences and similarities.

Malware

Generally speaking, “malware” is a generic term for any piece of software that has negative or malicious intentions. Examples of malware include, but are not limited to, viruses, remote access tools (RATs), and trojans. Each of these types of software are used for specific purposes and carry different sets of consequences and threats. These applications can be used to control a victim’s computer, destroy software (and in some cases hardware), and even install other pieces of software without the victim’s knowledge. Thus, malware can be devastating in both personal and corporate contexts. More...